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Flash Drag and Drop extended

Background

The basic example showed you how to make use of drag and drop to make a Mr Potato Head equivalent.
Hardly extremely educationally beneficial!

Yet the simple concept can easily be extended to create something of real educational value. The actual Flash programming is very basic, but the pedagogical benefits can clearly be seen.

Drag and drop activities can be used for all sorts of card sorting, categorising charts, pyramid diagrams, significance, venn diagrams, flow charts, timelines and. The real benefit here comes from the fact that you are giving more control over to the end user i.e. your students. You aren't forcing them to drop items in any specific place - they can place items where they see fit.

One area that ..... for a drag-and-drop activity is to consider De Bono's six thinking hats. This concept is where you have six hats, each offering an alternative interpretation or way to consider an issue.

This example is shown below - here you have to drag the hat you feel is most appropriate onto the statement. As already explained, this is a really simple exercise to program as all you need are the graphics and the drag & drop code - there are limitless possibilities here.



Flash fileJust in case you are interested, you can download the Flash source for the above example.
Flash source (535kb) NEEDS TO BE UPDATED


The task

However, this tutorial asks you to develop your own concept like this. Many of us make use of graphic organisers or templates to support students' learning. Any of these can be adapted into an effective ICT-based activity. Do remember that you should only make use of Flash if it provides clear added benefts for your students. If it doesn't add value - why bother?


Include example graphic organisers here - about 6 - and then give instructions how to adapt.




Details appear here


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